Universal’s comedy film “Good Boys” sprinted to the top of the North American box office in its opening weekend, unseating “Fast and Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw” with 21 million U.S. dollars.

Good Boys” has been the first R-rated comedy film which scored a top spot in North America in three years since 2016’s “The Boss.” Directed by Gene Stupnitsky and starring Jacob Tremblay, Brady Noon, and Keith L. Williams, the film tells the story of three sixth-grade boys who ditch school and embark on an epic journey.

The film earned 2.1 million dollars in 13 international territories for a global weekend of 23.1 million dollars, according to studio figures collected by measurement firm Comscore.

Good Boys received a B+ rating from moviegoers on CinemaScore and an 80-percent certified fresh rating on review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes.

According to Comscore, with Good Boys, Universal matches Disney with six films that have reached the No. 1 position at the North American box office this year.

After two weekends at the top of the North American box office, Universal’s action film Fast and Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw moved to second place with an estimated 14.14 million dollars in its third weekend. The film has collected 133.7 million dollars in North America for 437 million dollars through Sunday.

Directed by David Leitch, the film is a spin-off of “The Fast and the Furious” franchise. Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham form an unlikely alliance in the battle against a terrorist organization threatening the world with a deadly virus.

Disney’s “The Lion King” came in third with an estimated 11.9 million dollars in its fifth weekend, pushing its North American total to 496.1 million dollars for a global cume of 1,435.2 million dollars through Sunday. Directed by Jon Favreau, it is a photo-realistic remake of Disney’s 1994 animated film of the same name.

Sony’s animated comedy film “The Angry Birds Movie 2” opened in fourth place with an estimated 10.5 million dollars. Based on Rovio Entertainment’s Angry Birds video game series and directed by Thurop Van Orman, the film is the sequel to 2016’s “The Angry Birds Movie.”

CBS Films, eOne, and Lionsgate’s horror film “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” finished fifth with an estimated 10.05 million dollars in its second weekend, pushing its North American total to 40.21 million dollars through Sunday.

Directed by Andre Ovredal and produced by Guillermo del Toro, the PG-13 film was based on the best-selling children’s horror book series of the same name by Alvin Schwartz.

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