The US, Brazil, and India account for nearly 45% of all COVID-19 deaths globally, with the Latin American region alone responsible for more than a third of them.

Around the world, more than 1 million people have died of COVID-19 as of Tuesday, according to a Reuters tally, with the pace of fatalities picking up as infections again surge in several countries.

The deaths from coronavirus have doubled from half a million in just three months, led by fatalities in the US, Brazil, and India.

According to Reuters calculations based on average deaths so far in September, more than 5,400 people are dying around the world every 24 hours. It equates to around 226 people per hour, or one person every 16 seconds.

The US, Brazil, and India account for nearly 45% of all COVID-19 deaths globally, with the Latin American region alone responsible for more than a third of them.

India has become the latest epicenter of the pandemic globally, recording the highest daily growth in infections in the world in recent weeks, with an average of about 87,500 new cases each day since the start of September.

India will overtake the United States as the country with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases by the end of the year if the current trend continues,  even as Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government pushes ahead with easing lockdown measures in a bid to jumpstart the struggling economy.

Regardless of the surge in cases, India’s death toll of around 95,500 and pace of growth of fatalities remain below those of the United States, Britain, and Brazil.

The Health experts stressed that official data for both deaths and cases globally is almost certainly being underreported, especially in countries with limited testing capacity, since the first reported case in China in early January.

The global death rate has picked up from three months ago when an average of around 4,700 people were dying COVID-19 linked illness every 24 hours, or one person every 18 seconds.

The number of Infections is also rising again in the United States and setting new records in Europe, which accounts for nearly 25% of deaths. The WHO has warned of a worrying spread in western Europe just weeks away from the winter influenza season.

The World Health Organization has also warned that the pandemic still needs major control interventions amid rising case numbers in Latin America, where many countries have started to resume normal social and public life.

Most of Asia is experiencing a relative lull after emerging from a second wave. whereas officials in Australia have lifted some reimposed internal travel curbs.

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